Ashgrove Catholic Church

St Finbarr's Catholic Church, Ashgrove

The St Finbarr's Story

 

In 1919 “Betheden” in Ashgrove, once the residence of Mr W. J. Trouton, a well-known chemist, was purchased by Archbishop James Duhig. The Archbishop had the house renovated and the largest room was prepared for a chapel. It was dedicated by Archbishop Duhig and Archbishop Redwood (visiting from New Zealand) on 19th January, 1919.

On the following Sunday, 120 were present in the chapel when Archbishop Duhig celebrated Mass. The congregation was promised there would be Mass each Sunday. Initially the people were looked after by clergy from the Cathedral. A collection was already underway for the building of a parish church.

In 1921, the foundation stone of the church/school was blessed on the site of the present church. Fr Lalor was appointed the first Parish Priest. Accommodation for Fr Lalor was not available, so in the beginning the church also doubled as the presbytery. Then, when “Grantuly” was purchased, he stayed there until the presbytery was opened on 3rd May, 1925. Unfortunately he was not in residence for very long, as he was killed in a car accident on Waterworks Road on 25th August, 1925.

In the midst of this tragedy Fr William Hogan was appointed and he arrived on 6th September, 1925. The need for school accommodation was evident, so renovations and extensions of the building were undertaken. This wooden building served the parishioners very well for thirty years.  Fr Hogan was to shepherd the people of Ashgrove until his death on the 7th February, 1945.

Upon Fr Hogan’s death the Archbishop appointed Fr Daniel Cremin as the 3rd Parish Priest of Ashgrove.  The present church, blessed and opened by Archbishop Duhig on 17th March, 1957, replaced the church/school for which he had laid the foundation stone on 24th April, 1921. Fr Cremin died on Christmas Day, 1967, and was succeeded by Fr Dudley Boland. 

The present St Finbarr’s primary school, blessed and opened by Bishop Kennedy on 20th September, 1970, replaced the one opened in 1925. With Fr Boland’s retirement in 1978, Fr Pat Cleary was made Parish Priest and remained in that position until 1998.

In 1999, Ashgrove joined neighbouring parishes in an extensive time of pastoral review from which eventually emerged its linking with the historic parishes of Rosalie, Bardon, Herston, Newmarket and Red Hill.

On 9th November 2006 these churches formally combined to form the Jubilee Parish with Fr Peter Brannelly appointed as the foundation Parish Priest.

In 2011 St Finbarr’s church completed a major refurbishment which will ensure that she continues to play a pivotal role in our lives and the life of our community. Alongside the church refurbishment extensive maintenance was carried out at St Finbarr’s school, with improvements to the hall and gathering area providing many opportunities to the community.

In 2016 the St Finbarr’s parishioners welcomed the Latin American Catholic Community to Ashgrove.  Every Sunday at 11:30am St Finbarr’s is overflowing with colour and music and our Latin American brothers and sisters celebrate mass in Spanish.  They extend a warm welcome to join them each Sunday. 

Every Saturday evening our Saturday vigil Mass is at 6pm and our popular Sunday morning Mass begins at 8:30am.  Welcome.

 

Address:

 

202 Waterworks Road

Ashgrove QLD 4060

  

 

Mass Times:

Saturday:       6.00pm

Sunday:         8.30am

 

(*Please refer to the current week’s newsletter for the weekday Masses)

 

 

Patron Saints:

St Finbarr founded a monastery which attracted many disciples, and the city of Cork grew up around it. Finbarr was the city’s first bishop. The many fanciful legends about him tell us, if nothing else, that he was held in high regard.  He died in 633 and we celebrate his feast on 25th September.

Map:

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